Glitz Glam and Rebellion Blog — themoreyouknow

It’s Alive, It’s Alive! : The Rise of Horror Movies in the 1930s-1950s

Posted by Liz T. on

It’s spooky season, so we’ve been revisiting some of our old favorite movies about things that go bump in the night. Although classic horror movies like Dracula and Frankenstein may strike modern audiences as more campy than scary, many were technologically impressive at the time and have left a lasting impact on modern mythology even nearly a century later. Let’s take a quick look at how the horror movie genre changed from the 1930s to the 1950s. The rise of the feature-length talkies, or movies with recorded dialogue in addition to sound effects and music, began in 1927 with The...

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We Love Lucy: The Legacy of Lucille Ball

Posted by Liz T. on

Lucille Ball (August 6, 1911 - April 26, 1989) was a fiery and hilarious comedienne, actress, and producer who continually broke barriers for women in television. In honor of what would have been her 109th birthday, let's look at why she is still so loved. Lucille got her start as a model before performing on Broadway. In the 1930s and 1940s, she took on small roles in several films as a contract player. During this time, she met Cuban band leader Desi Arnez and the two were married in 1940. Lucille's first notable success after the success of a radio comedy, My Favorite Husband, during which she learned that...

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Swimming Pinups: The Weeki Wachee Mermaids

Posted by Liz T. on

Weeki Wachee Springs, Florida has been the home of a legendary mermaid show since 1947, in which talented and glamorous swimmers perform in a crystal-clear natural spring. The audience watches these timeless performances from a man-made theater that is embedded in the side of the spring and submerged 16 feet below the surface. The Weeki Wachee show was created by Newton Perry, a former US Navy Seal Instructor and noted swim performer, who turned this stunning natural feature into the ultimate 1950s roadside attraction.  Weeki Wachee is the deepest known freshwater cave system in the United States and the actual bottom of the spring...

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Sparkle Moore, a Rockabilly Icon

Posted by Liz T. on

Sparkle Moore was an influential pioneer of early rockabilly music, despite only being in the spotlight for a couple of years. Notably for the time, she wrote, played, and sang her own material. She was a multi-instrumental musician who got her start on a Hawaiian guitar as a child, later performing on cello, bassoon, string bass, and, of course, with her unique voice. With her lilting voice and swooping delivery, she rose to recognition after sending a home recording of an original piece to KOWH DJ Grahame Richards. He was very much impressed by her talents and put her in...

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Moonshine Cars: The First Hot Rods

Posted by Liz T. on

How did hot rods get started? Beyond the innate human urge to tinker with everything, hot rod culture got its roots in the “moonshine cars” bootleggers used to transport concealed alcohol during the U. S. Prohibition. These bootleggers or rumrunners used their heavily-modified autos to stay ahead of agents & law enforcement, while getting the contraband where it needed to go in as discreet a fashion as possible. The drivers required machines with more power and better handling capabilities than the standard automobiles of the day in order to elude authorities safely when speeding down rocky trails and curvy backroads. ...

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